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The Best Romance Ever Is

Darcy and Elizabeth in Pride and Prejudice, I’d say, is the best romance ever. Other possible answers for me include Edward and Jane in Jane Eyre.

In movies, I loved Romancing the Stone!

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Have you read or seen The Ghost and Mrs. Muir? Also Notorious is an excellent Romance mixed with Spy antics.

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Carol and Therese in CAROL or PRICE OF SALT!

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I second this! (re: Carol & Therese :sob: :heart:)

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Glad you agree! For me, it’s amazing how slow and steady their romance is, how it builds over tension. Makes the roadtrip where it all goes down a lot more powerful!

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I haven’t delved into love as a major theme yet. In my next novella, I hope to explore the qualities of a a healthy long-standing marriage.
Is there a difference between romances that “build” and those based on conflicts, I wonder.
Are the best romances dynamic or static? In Pride and Prejudice, the romance is ever-evolving dynamic. In Romeo and Juliet, it is solid and static, and the conflicts occur outside of the relationship.

I think hands down, the best romances are dynamic and complex, no?

At the center of the story, I’d say yes. With internal conflicts, the more complexity, the better, as they create tension. Fictional stories that - are not “romances” - but that feature a “romance” are also enjoyable. With these, the romance is not central, but static and used to enhance an exterior conflict.

:slight_smile:

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By what meter are you defining the “best romance ever”? Personal preference? Effect on pop culture? If going by the latter, Romeo & Juliet is the clear winner. Over the centuries, audiences have always responded most to the doomed romance. We all know what it’s like to lose in love. Romances without sorrow simply aren’t compelling. The lovers dealing with heart break, and haunted by “what if” will always move us more than the couple who blissfully ride off into the sunset, because we can recognize their struggles as our own.

I appreciate your point of view here and generally agree. However, I often wonder at the impulse that writers have to avoid writing about couples. Typically, a love story ends in tragedy or in blissfulness and that’s it. So what happens then?
Few writers venture into the story of the after story. I’d find this after story interesting.

That’s because the after story is where the woe happens. In most “happily ever after” stories it ends immediately after marriage. Cinderella leaves in the carriage with the prince? Stop right there. No need to go into marriage fights, and how they both change because they’re married. Cinderella is happy with Prince Charming, but what happens when they go to a ball where she meets Prince Phillip? Now she looks at Charming and thinks, “Aurora has someone who fought a dragon for her, and you couldn’t even tell who I was without trying a glass slipper on every damn girl in the kingdom!” What happens when the princess falls in danger of falling out of love with the prince? THAT I believe would be the more interesting love story, and certainly the more truthful one.

Did you ever see “Enchanted” An excellent what-if film about Princesses and Prince Charming, etc.

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I loved Enchanted. :slight_smile:

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Enchanted was amusing. Amy Adams was delightful in that movie. Who wouldn’t fall in love with her?

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I’ve been Dreaming… WHAM!